News By/Courtesy: TEJAS SHIVALKAR | 06 Jun 2020 9:21am IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • The pandemic triggered many countries in the world for strict lockouts, seal borders and reverse economic activities
  • Everyday carbon dioxide emissions around the world declined by around 18.7 million tons at the peak of the corónavirus containment
  • In the new analysis, researchers looked at lockdown measures for 97% of global carbon dioxide emissions in 69 countries

The pandemic triggered many countries in the world for strict lockouts, seal borders and reverse economic activities. A study released showed that these activities contributed to an estimated 17% reduction in global emissions of carbon dioxide compared with 2019 global daily averages. It's the world's largest drop in recorded history, scientists claim.

Everyday carbon dioxide emissions around the world declined by around 18.7 million tons at the peak of the corónavirus containment in early April in comparison with average daily emissions, down to levels last recorded in 2006, according to the new study released in Nature Climate Change journal.

The study found that drastic improvements in infrastructure, manufacturing activities and air travel in the locked-down nations could also fuel a reduction of up to 7% this year's annual carbon emissions. Although these declines are significant, scientists claim they are unlikely to impact for the longer term once countries return to normal unless policymakers position investment and infrastructure as their priority in reducing harmful emissions.

"We have never seen such a big fall on the global level and, on an annual basis, you have to return to the Second World War to see a big emission fall," said Corinne Le Quéré, a professor at the University of East Anglia and the UK study's lead author. "We 're not even seeing this big fall every year." But this is not the way of coping with climate change — that will not happen by pressuring people to change their behaviour. We must address that by helping people move towards more sustainable livelihoods.

The study found the strongest decrease – 43% of the overall decrease – in carbon emissions was due to a reduced car, bus and truck traffic. Industrial emissions that have been significantly reduced in the hit hardest nations have dropped by 19%.

Air travel emissions, which saw a staggering 75% decrease in daily operations in early April, decreased 60%. However, this decrease represented a much smaller proportion of the decrease overall, since air travel typically accounts for only 2.8% of world emissions each year.

"Flight was two-thirds down," Rob Jackson, Stanford University Professor in earth system science and co-author of the study, said: "Surfaces — cars and cars — are about 10 times larger in emissions."

In the new analysis, researchers looked at lockdown measures for 97% of global carbon dioxide emissions in 69 countries. Since the measurement of carbon dioxide emissions is not possible in real-time, scientists have used data on the impact of six key business sectors in the Member States from January to April, such as industrial activities, land transport and air travel. They then calculated how emissions and their contribution to annual emissions in these sectors were changed based on the severity of the socially distant constraints of each nation.

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT INTEND TO HURT THE SENTIMENTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL, COMMUNITY, SECT, OR RELIGION ETCETERA. THIS ARTICLE IS BASED PURELY ON THE AUTHOR'S PERSONAL VIEWS AND OPINIONS IN THE EXERCISE OF THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT GUARANTEED UNDER ARTICLE 19(1)(A) AND OTHER RELATED LAWS BEING FORCE IN INDIA, FOR THE TIME BEING.

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 06 Jun 2020 11:18am IST


Tags : Carbon Emissions, Environment

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