News By/Courtesy: Athul Joseph | 03 Jun 2020 19:36pm IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • streets of Hong Kong was a ground for protest for almost a year.
  • The newly approved National security laws can render the autonomy given to Hong Kong to senseless.
  • One Country two system agreement in danger.

Even during the pandemic crisis, political tensions in the region of China and Hong Kong are on an upward rise. The political instability and tension are the biggest one in the special administrative territory in the past several decades. The people of Hong Kong are out in the streets for over a year, hundreds and thousands demonstrating against a series of rather unpopular bills. All of these started with the extradition bill, which allowed the residents in Hong Kong to be tried for the crimes that they committed in Taiwan, but the same law would allow the extradition to mainland china. Claudia Mo, a pro-democracy legislator from Hong Kong, states that “In China, there is no fair trial, no humane way of punishment and there is completely no separation of powers.” And this sparked the protest, which has been going on for over a year.

China and Hong Kong are two very different places with complex political relationships, and this newly proposed bill threatens to give china more power and authority over Hong Kong. Hong Kong is a semi-autonomous region, China and Hong Kong follows the agreement of one country two systems, which gave Hong Kong several rights and a high degree of autonomy, unlike porcelain. One country two systems agreement was meant to last for 50 years, and in 2047, Hong Kong is expected to become part of mainland China fully. The new bill is widely seen as the pro-china agenda, and the law will play an essential role in the encroachment of china in the autonomy of Hong Kong.

The current protest id, not the first of its kind in Hong Kong it has happened in 2004 and 2017, but the ongoing protest is the biggest of them all as people are involved. The young generations occupy the forefront of the protest as they are the first generation born under “one country two systems.” After the period ends in 2047, these young generations are to suffer. The protesters have convinced the government to withdraw the bill, and yet tensions continue in Hong Kong.  This is because fighting against the law is just a part of the larger picture, fighting back the Chinese encroachments as before it’s too late.

Recently the Chinese parliament has approved national security laws that bypass Hong  Kong’s legislature. The law criminalizes acts of treason and terrorism; this is hugely controversial as the new law will allow for regulations regarding subversion of state power secession and terrorism and interference by external forces. This law doesn’t need to be approved by the legislative council of Hong Kong. It further reduces the freedom of speech and freedom of assembly in Hong Kong. Hong Kong citizens and nationals worldwide believe that this move would further deepen the Chinese encroachment in Honk Kong, and their culture will be ruined. People fear that this bill will also destroy the one country two system principle and turn it directly to a one country one system. The Hong Kong national security law also requires the Hong Kong government to set up a national security agency in Hong Kong. The chief executive of Hong Kong is also expected to submit regular reports of national security to the central government. The law could eventually bring the city under the control of mainland china and strip away Hong Kong’s position as an East Asian trading hub.

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT INTEND TO HURT THE SENTIMENTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL, COMMUNITY, SECT, OR RELIGION ETCETERA. THIS ARTICLE IS BASED PURELY ON THE AUTHOR'S PERSONAL VIEWS AND OPINIONS IN THE EXERCISE OF THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT GUARANTEED UNDER ARTICLE 19(1)(A) AND OTHER RELATED LAWS BEING FORCE IN INDIA, FOR THE TIME BEING. 

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 04 Jun 2020 5:17am IST


Tags : Hong Kong Rights political Agenda China

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