News By/Courtesy: Daksh Dave | 27 Jun 2020 0:26am IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Blinded
  • Series
  • Corruption

The tale of conspirators and scams involving the once-respected Swedish bank “Blinded” (Thursday, July 2, Sundance Now) is so rife with plotters, frauds, fellow travelers, and innocents that it is always difficult to say the victims’ swindlers. That this doesn’t at least at the end of the day is a testament to the strength of this fact-based drama (chief writer Jesper Harries).

One of the most endearing aspects of this subtitled series is the frequent interruption of “Let’s Face the Music and Dance” by Irving Berlin in all eight episodes, haunted by Swedish singer Grant. The emphasis here is on the first line of the song—“There may be trouble ahead. Indeed, at every stage, there are problems with the family-owned ST Bank, all of which are the product of criminal activities, including the falsification of its financial reports. Some of the revelations about the activities of the bank had come about thanks to one woman — the ambitious and frustrated young newspaper writer Bea Farkas (Julia Ragnarsson), who typically pursues any hint of irregularity, however small, in the belief that any suspicion is promising. Her unyielding confidence and trust in her ability to smell lies have put her in a position of some significance to her article. She had been fired from that job by the editor-in-chief who saw her as an uncontrollable force. Crowded though the series is — moved, actually — full of distinctive, admirably drawn characters. Rooth, perhaps the most intriguing figure, is more than just a wily top executive, however slender, assured, and impeccably tailored he may look; one wide shot reveals the array-like immensity of his Master of the Universe closet with its rows of suits and shirts. But he also proves to be a man of principle, surprisingly stern about the kind of values that his young son is taking up. He’s not happy when he hears, one day, the boy’s casual story of how he and his friend teased a beggar sitting in front of a supermarket.i

A friend, Rooth 's son explained, had money with him — a big bill — that he told the beggar he could have had a song and a dance for them. So you thought, Rooth asked his son, that it was funny to see someone who wasn't born into privilege, as you were, humiliate himself? The boy claims that it was his friend, Victor, who had the money, Victor, who said it to the man. And his father tells him that he doesn't have to say that he was a friend of his. "You're never going to say 'Victor' again." Then Rooth tells the boy that they're going to find that beggar and his son is going to apologize to him. 

"Blinded" is, above all, supposed to be a tale of greed and deceit, one in which many innocents among the bank's workers were caught up in shoddy investments and now stood to lose all.

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT INTEND TO HURT THE SENTIMENTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL, COMMUNITY, SECT, OR RELIGION ETCETERA. THIS ARTICLE IS BASED PURELY ON THE AUTHOR'S PERSONAL VIEWS AND OPINIONS IN THE EXERCISE OF THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT GUARANTEED UNDER ARTICLE 19(1)(A) AND OTHER RELATED LAWS BEING FORCE IN INDIA, FOR THE TIME BEING.

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 27 Jun 2020 9:31am IST


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