News By/Courtesy: Athul Joseph | 28 Jun 2020 22:25pm IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • With the third and final season out dark is gaining a insane amount of fan following .
  • Like Stranger Things and The OA, Dark offers teen viewers the fantasy of events with global or greater importance depending on their own actions.
  • Lest viewers start pinning mugshots of the characters to their walls and linking them with strings.

On the surface, it's easy to see why Netflix picked up this German import from Baran Bo Odar and Jantje Friese: the ties of the Stranger Stuff are hard to skip, and the producers of the series have no trouble relying on them. In an interview, Friese said, "It's very interesting, because if all the people who watched Stranger Things are at least talking about watching Demon, I think that's a huge chance for us ... so keep comparing it." But once you get over the initial shock of the similarities of the Stranger Stuff, you'll find that Dark is a far more somber, more expressionistic series. Although it's dealing with the events of the 1980s, it's not tinged with nostalgia. Dark starts up with a suicide by hanging, and it's just getting worse. A boy named Erik (Paul Radom) has gone missing in a German suburb surrounded by eerie forests. His disappearance put the whole town on the brink, but sadly, for Dark 's characters, it's not going to be the only disappearance in the series.

The city may not know where Erik is, but we do. Or at least, we've got some kind of idea: it's locked in a brightly colored children's bedroom, where a TV rings all day, and what looks like an electric chair sits ominously in the middle of the room. Occasionally, an unidentified figure is going to enter the room, tie Erik in the chair, and do something to him. Dark plays all this close to the chest: we 're never sure what's going on here, but we know it can't be a positive thing. One night, a group of teenagers is walking through the woods, with young Mikkel (Daan Lennard Liebrenz) on their way. After the group fled the woods in panic after they were frightened, they noticed that Mikkel was missing. A search party has been organized. Now the town has two children missing. And it looks like they're going to have a heck of a time to find Mikkel, as we'll soon discover that the boy has somehow ended up back in time. He found himself in the same basement, but in the 1980s, he soon came across younger versions of his parents and other locals. It's kind of like Back to the Future with a body count, and everyone's unhappy.

Things only get weirder from here, like flocks of birds dropping dead in both timelines, a mysterious cave that seems to be a portal to the past and the present, an unidentified boy who is dead in the present but maybe from the past, and more. Everything this happens with an unsettling calmness; what we're seeing is distressing and upsetting, but Bo Odar and Friese study it all with an almost scientific detachment – we 're here as an audience to experience all this trauma.

The slow burn isn't going to be for everyone, and Dark may suffer from a narrative that's just a little too impenetrable. The first episode alone feels submerged under tireless publicity, as the series bounces from scene to scene, character to character, pointing out the various characters we 're going to have to keep track of. But as soon as you get beyond the slightly daunting initial chapter, Dark settles into a sweet, eerie rhythm. In the end, don't be surprised if you find yourself becoming obsessed with Dark, burning through episodes like you're hungry for more. If Netflix had hoped for another Stranger Things-like hit, they might have just found it.

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT INTEND TO HURT THE SENTIMENTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL, COMMUNITY, SECT, OR RELIGION ETCETERA. THIS ARTICLE IS BASED PURELY ON THE AUTHOR'S PERSONAL VIEWS AND OPINIONS IN THE EXERCISE OF THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT GUARANTEED UNDER ARTICLE 19(1)(A) AND OTHER RELATED LAWS BEING FORCE IN INDIA, FOR THE TIME BEING. 

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 28 Jun 2020 23:03pm IST


Tags : Dark Netflix german

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