News By/Courtesy: Riya Singh | 29 Jul 2020 13:28pm IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Abhishek Bachchan is the whole and soul of Amazon Prime series, Breathe: Into The Shadows
  • 12 long episodes, 50 minutes each, in which he smolders a whole lot, in different ways: angry smolder, creepy smolder, charming smolder, fatherly smolder
  • The cinematography, background score, and pace of editing in Breathe: Into The Shadows all fight for your attention, flaunting technique to cover up for too much indulgence

Abhishek Bachchan is the whole and soul of Amazon Prime series, Breathe: Into The Shadows, which is perhaps why we have 12 long episodes, 50 minutes each, in which he smolders a whole lot, in different ways: angry smolder, creepy smolder, charming smolder, fatherly smolder. And all of this smoldering comes in handy, because as we get deeper into the show, the deeper we are getting into Abhishek Bachchan's character. It's all a dramatic labyrinth with Abhishek Bachchan's omnipresent voiceover following you around, telling you a story you want to stop listening to, but just can't, for some bizarre reason. 

I wonder what the makers of Breathe: Into the Shadows saw in a 60-minute premise to drag it on for 12 episodes, each lasting a little less than one hour.

Prolonging a thin thriller results in a slog of a series that is utterly devoid of smarts, urgency, or intrigue.

R Madhavan's questionable morality as a football coach trying to save his ailing son by bumping off folks listed higher up on the organ donation list hinged on his believable desperation.

The follow-up season in spirit treads the same line -- how far a parent will go for the sake of his/her kid?

A little girl is kidnapped in the middle of a birthday party. Sia’s distraught parents, Dr. Avinash Sabharwal (Bachchan) and Abha (Menen) start losing hope as the police fruitlessly flail about and time passes by. And then one day, a menacing voice on a digital device announces that to get her back there will be a drastic quid pro quo, involving other lives.

There are some parts of the series that work better, especially those which topline Amit Sadh reprising his conflicted crime branch cop Kabir Sawant from the first season. He’s been transferred from Mumbai to Delhi, but his anger management skills are still as terrible, so he goes about losing his top whenever provoked. Alongside him, are the two other characters who make the most of their time on screen, Hrishikesh Joshi and Srikant Verma, as a Tweedledee-and-Tweedledum combo, faithful companions to our cop, whose fight is two-fold: against his temper, and a serial killer who is busy painting his victims as the ten heads of Ravan. Why? By the time we start getting the hang of the convoluted, confused logic, the reveals have begun. We know who the ‘Bad Uncle’ is (well, duh: alert viewers will twig on real fast) and the last few episodes stretch our patience even more, as the series rolls towards a predictable denouement.

The cinematography, background score, and pace of editing in Breathe: Into The Shadows all fight for your attention, flaunting technique to cover up for too much indulgence. To their credit, Abhishek Bachchan, Nithya Menen, Amit Sadh, and Saiyami Kher perform their parts well, but it is the overall writing that lets them down.

In a bid to be The Next Intelligent Web Show ™, Breathe: Into The Shadows stifles its potential, by taking itself too seriously and not committing to a unified intent.

 

This article does not intend to hurt the sentiments of any individual, community, sect, or religion etcetera. This article is based purely on the author’s personal opinion and views in the exercise of the Fundamental Rights guaranteed under Article 19(1)(A) and other related laws being enforced in India for the time being.

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 29 Jul 2020 22:21pm IST


Tags : #breathe2#review

Latest News







Copyright Kalyan Krishna MediaZ Private Limited. All rights reserved. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials on these pages are copyrighted by Kalyan Krishna MediaZ Private Limited. All rights reserved. No part of these pages, either text or image may be used for any purpose. By continuing past this page, you agree to our Terms of Service, Cookie Policy, Privacy Policy and Content Policies.