News By/Courtesy: Aakash Raj | 26 Feb 2021 13:44pm IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • skill India
  • inequality
  • statistics

Unemployment of Skilled Youth In India India's finance minister, Nirmala Sitharaman, echoed the country's contribution to the 'Skill India' program in her maiden budget statement, noting that the government helps millions to take up industry-relevant skills training, improving their job opportunities. Nevertheless, a study of the unit-level results from the Periodic Labor Force Survey 2017-18 shows that the truth is quite bleak. According to the results, only a small segment of young people reported having any vocational training, and a large proportion of them was either unemployed or out of the labor force. Nationally, in 2017-18, only 1.8% of the population registered having earned formal vocational/technical training. 5.6 percent registered informal vocational training earned (such as hereditary, self-learning, and on the job training). This suggests that 93% of the population has not earned any vocational/technical instruction from formal or informal sources. More than half of the persons who earned formal vocational/technical instruction were young people (15-29 years old). The youth people with 'industry-relevant' formal vocational schooling would have greater job opportunities, one would think. But about 42% of the young people (15-29 years of age) who earned advanced vocational training were not at all part of the workforce. For young people who did not undergo such instruction, 62.3% were outside the workforce. Substantial shares of the women who earned such training were out of the workforce through age ranges. The challenge in seeking a career may be one factor why such a vast number of 'skilled' employees were out of the labor force. In 2017-18, about 33 percent of professionally educated young people became unemployed. The unemployment rate was also higher at 40% for newly educated young people who finished training during the previous year. With these high unemployment rates, following a fruitless work quest, many young men and women may have moved out of the labor force entirely. Men and women got substantially different kinds of instruction, reinforcing labor market inequality. About 80% of the trainees were men in the fields of agriculture & food processing, telecommunications, media & mass communication. Women dominated the areas of beauty & fitness, fashion, crafts, hospitality, and healthcare. While the PMKVY seeks to offer free instruction, the PLFS data indicates that the majority of young people who have undergone formal training have had to bear the cost of training. The government supported just 16% of the young people who earned specialized instruction. About 73% of trainees have completed full-time training. While the PMKVY seeks to offer free instruction, the PLFS data indicates that the majority of young people who have undergone formal training have had to bear the cost of training. The government supported just 16% of the young people who earned specialized instruction. About 73% of trainees have completed full-time training. More than half of the young people had a training cycle of more than one year, and about 30% had more than two years of training. In general, the bulk of young people fall outside the scope of formal schooling and many of those who pursue months of advanced training at their own expense remain unemployed.

 

This Article Does Not Intend To Hurt The Sentiments Of Any Individual Community, Sect, Or Religion Etcetera. This Article Is Based Purely On The Authors Personal Views And Opinions In The Exercise Of The Fundamental Right Guaranteed Under Article 19(1)(A) And Other Related Laws Being Force In India, For The Time Being.

Section Editor: 5thVoice.News | 26 Feb 2021 15:56pm IST


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