News By/Courtesy: Abhipsha Datta | 14 Apr 2021 15:11pm IST

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Greenpeace has exposed the widespread use of illegal driftnets in the northwest Indian Ocean.
  • Drift netting is a prohibited fishing technique and is being used indiscriminately in the northwest part of the Indian Ocean.
  • Since these nets are often made of non-biodegradable materials, they can remain in oceans as ‘ghost nets’ continuing to trap marine life.

Greenpeace has exposed the widespread use of illegal driftnets in the northwest Indian Ocean. The Non-governmental environmental organization says that the use of driftnets is annihilating marine life in the world’s most ecologically vulnerable fishing grounds. Drift netting is a prohibited fishing technique and is being used indiscriminately in the northwest part of the Indian Ocean. It is known as one of the simplest and oldest techniques of fishing. Driftnets are hung vertically in water bodies to trap fish in the mesh. Commercial fisheries prefer to use this technique as they can trap large quantities of fish, at a comparatively minimal cost of installation. Drift nets pose a threat to marine life as they tend to get lost at sea due to storm currents or other accidents. Since these nets are often made of non-biodegradable materials, they can remain in oceans as ‘ghost nets’ continuing to trap marine life. In the course of two weeks at sea, the environmental organization has observed and filmed seven ships within 20 square miles (50 sq km) using drift nets to catch tuna. It spotted another eight vessels on radar using navigational patterns that also suggested the use of nets. Greenpeace states that if Yellowfin tuna continues to decrease at the current rate then the region's food security, as well as the local economies, will be jeopardized. Driftnets create walls of death for sea creatures due to the quantity of other sea life that they catch in addition to the fish they are set for. United Nations banned the use of driftnets 30 years ago. The environmental organization shared with Reuters, footage of sharks and manta rays that were lying decimated in the nets, set some 500 miles (800 km) east of Somalia. Greenpeace expressed its concern about all fish in the Indian Ocean due to the issues of bycatch. It said that the same area had also seen a significant increase in unregulated squid fishing. Will McCallum, head of oceans for Greenpeace UK, in comments to Reuters, questions the United Nations ban on driftnets when all the fishing vessels are seen using driftnets. McCallum says that there is little to no enforcement in international waters and it is necessary to have a global ocean treaty to fix this enormous governance gap. Nations are due to meet for negotiations over such a pact in August. The goal is to set up safeguards for parts of the ocean similar to reserves established on land. Representatives of 30 nations met last month to discuss ways to save fast-depleting tuna stocks in the Indian Ocean. However, the meeting ended without any new agreement. 

 

This Article Does Not Intend To Hurt The Sentiments Of Any Individual Community, Sect, Or Religion Etcetera. This Article Is Based Purely On The Authors Personal Views And Opinions In The Exercise Of The Fundamental Right Guaranteed Under Article 19(1)(A) And Other Related Laws Being Force In India, For The Time Being. Further, despite all efforts that have been made to ensure the accuracy and correctness of the information published, 5thVoice.News shall not be responsible for any errors caused due to human error or otherwise.

Section Editor: 5thVoice.News | 15 Apr 2021 6:14am IST


Tags : #Greenpeace #Savemarinelife

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