News By/Courtesy: TEJAS SHIVALKAR | 10 Jun 2020 11:37am IST

Recent research aimed to model how SARS-CoV-2, the virus that triggers Covid-19, would propagate across hospital surfaces. The researchers did not use the SARS-CoV-2 virus for protection but reproduced artificially a portion of DNA from a plant-infecting virus that can not infect humans, instead applied it to a milliliter of water at a concentration close to SARS-CoV-2 copies present in respiratory samples of infected patients.

The result: the virus DNA left on a hospital bed rail was detected within 10 hours in almost half of all places tested around a clinic, and lasted for at least five days. The research, reported as a letter in the Journal of Hospital Infection, by University College London and Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH).

Researchers placed the DNA-containing water on the handrail in an isolation room – that is, a room for patients with higher risk or infection – and then sampled 44 sites across a hospital ward over the next five days. They found that the surrogate genetic material had spread over the hospital ward to 41 percent of sites sampled after 10 hours, from bed rails to door handles to armrests in a waiting room to children's toys and books in a play area. This increased after three days to 59 percent of sites, falling on the fifth day to 41 percent.

The highest proportion of sites that were positively tested for the surrogate came from a nearby bedroom with several more beds and clinical environments such as treatment rooms. On day three, 86 percent of the samples tested positive in therapeutic regions, while on day four, 60 percent tested positive in the immediate bedroom area.

It is predicted that SARS-CoV-2 can be distributed by body moisture, such as cough droplets. DNA in water is used in the analysis. More sticky material, like mucus, is potentially more quickly dispersed. One caution is that if a virus is left over on a surface it can not determine how likely a human is to be infected while it shows how rapidly the virus may spread.

In a quote, Dr. Lena Ciric of UCL, a lead author of the report, said: "The essential function of surfaces in spreading viruses and how vital it is to stick to the proper hand hygiene and clean-up was illustrated in our research. Our replacement was once inoculated in a single place and distributed to workers, patients, and tourists by touching surfaces. A person with SARS-CoV-2 will, however, sprinkle, and touch the virus on more than one site."

THIS ARTICLE DOES NOT INTEND TO HURT THE SENTIMENTS OF ANY INDIVIDUAL, COMMUNITY, SECT, OR RELIGION ETCETERA. THIS ARTICLE IS BASED PURELY ON THE AUTHOR'S PERSONAL VIEWS AND OPINIONS IN THE EXERCISE OF THE FUNDAMENTAL RIGHT GUARANTEED UNDER ARTICLE 19(1)(A) AND OTHER RELATED LAWS BEING FORCE IN INDIA, FOR THE TIME BEING.

Section Editor: Pushpit Singh | 10 Jun 2020 12:55pm IST


Tags : COVID-19, Researchers

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